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Ronda is situated in a very mountainous area about 2500 feet above mean sea level.

The Guadalevín River runs through the city, dividing it in two and carving out the steep,

350 feet deep El Tajo canyon upon which the city perches.

                   

Iglesia de La Merced, The bullring, and the new town of Ronda

                   

Plaza de Socorro with it’s wonderful parish church, water fountain with lions,

and the casino building where Blas Infante opened the first Andalusian assembly.

                   

                   

Hotel San Gabriel , “Your Home in Ronda”

Built in 1736, this ancient Andalucian house with its original Coat of Arms

and handsome stone façade, maintains San Gabriel’s authentic Spanish flavor.

                   

                     

Puente Nuevo. The large and incredible bridge over the gorge (el Tajo),

finished in 1793. The height from top to bottom is about 100 m,

like a 30 floor building. Inside the bridge there is a small museum.

                   

The unparalleled views out over the Serranía de Ronda mountains.

                  

We hiked down to the waterfall

                   

Below - La Ciudad. The old district of Ronda, beyond the new bridge.

It is full of twisting, narrow streets.

                    

Below - The palace of Mondragon, also known as Palace of the Marquis of Villasierra,

is the most significant civil monument of Ronda, built in 1306 - 1314.

                   

                   

Below - The clifftop garden of the Mondragon Palace

                   

                   

Below - The beautiful La Ciudad, Ronda's Old Town, Andalusia, Spain

                   

Below - The church of Santa María La Mayor is one of the most important sacred monuments of Ronda.

According to the archaeological studies developed at the region, the church of the Virgin Mary

of the Incarnation was located near the ruins of a paleochristian basilica from the 5th century A.D.

It is a Gothic style cathedral that, inside, has elements of the Baroque and Rococo as well.

                   

                   

We descended the steps of a zigzag staircase cut into the wall by the Moors

in the 14th century to access water when under siege.

                   

                   

Beautiful views of the new part of Ronda and the Old Bridge (Puente Viejo) from the wall

                   

After climbing back up, we emerged in the new town of Ronda.

                             

As the sun set, we snapped our final photos of Ronda, before hitting the Jacuzzi bath.