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Peterskirche (St. Peter's Church) is the second-oldest church in Vienna, and the spot

on which it stands could well be Vienna's oldest Christian church site.

It's believed that a place of worship stood here in the second half of the 4th century.

Charlamagne is credited with having founded a church on the site in the late 8th century.
 

                   

The present St. Peter's is the most lavishly decorated baroque church in Vienna.

Gabriel Montani designed it in 1702. Hildebrandt, the noted architect of the Belvedere Palace,

is believed to have finished the building in 1732. The fresco in the dome is a masterpiece

by J. M. Rottmayr depicting the coronation of the Virgin. The church contains many frescoes

and much gilded wood, plus altarpieces done by well-known artists of the period.


                   

BELOW - The Minoritenkirche (Minorite Church) is a 13th-century Gothic church

that later received a baroque facelift. If you think the tower looks a little stubby,

you’re right on the button: it was ‘shortened’ by the Turks in 1529.

                   

BELOW - Karlskirche (St. Charles's Church) is a baroque church located on the south

side of Karlsplatz in Vienna, Austria. Widely considered the most outstanding

baroque church in Vienna, as well as one of the city's greatest buildings.

                   

BELOW -  Belvedere Palace and gardens

The construction of the Upper Belvedere began in 1717 and was completed in 1723.

         

The main purpose of our visit to Belvedere was to see the Gustav Klimt exhibit.

Gustav Klimt was an Austrian symbolist painter and one of the most prominent

members of the Vienna Secession movement.

Klimt is noted for his paintings, Judith and The Kiss (below).

                   

BELOW - Stadtpark is the richest park in Vienna for monuments and sculptures.

Meadows, flowerbeds, the occasional exotic tree and a large pond make the Stadtpark

a green oasis in the center of the city. The park was opened in 1862, following the demolition

 of the old city wall and the construction of the Ringstraße, and was Vienna's first public park.

                   

BELOW - Stadtpark, and Stephansplatz

          bagpipes