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Prague is a city of churches and cathedrals. From St. Vitus Cathedral at Prague Castle

to Tyn Church in Old Town Square, this is the 'city of a thousand spires'.

We visited a number of churches and present just a few here.

BELOW - The Church of St. James (kostel Sv. Jakuba Vetsiho). Its decorations are considered

to be the most beautiful and valuable in Prague. The church contains 23 chapels and is

part of many legends. After St. Vitus Cathedral, it is the second largest church in Prague.

                   

BELOW - The church’s acoustics are great, that is why there are so many concerts held there.

One of the prides of the church is a magnificent organ from 1702.


                   

ABOVE RIGHT and BELOW LEFT - The Church of Mother of God in front of Tın,

often translated as Church of Our Lady in front of Tın, is a dominant feature of the

Old Town , and has been the main church of this part of the city since the 14th century.

BELOW MIDDLE - The lovely white façade of St. Nicholas Church in the Old Town Square

                   

The Church of St. Francis of Assisi from 1688, inspired by contemporary Roman

architecture, is an exceptional work of a Burgundy architect Jean Baptiste Mathey.

Interior decorations stand out by their sophistication dominated by a fresco of the

Last Judgement by the famous Prague Baroque painter Vaclav Vavrinec Reiner.

                   

St. Salvator Church is part of a group of buildings forming the oldest Czech Jesuit College - the Klementinum.

St. Salvator has a beautiful Baroque facia, with porticos decorated with sand-stone sculptures

 of saints by Jan Jirí Bendl. A niche in the wall houses a sculpture of the Virgin Mary.

                   

BELOW - Construction of the baroque St. Nicholas Church in the Little Quarter

began in 1703, on the site of a former parish church, which dates back to 1283.

         

BELOW - The Astronomical Clock, built into one side of the Old Town Hall Tower,

dates from the 15th century. At the top of the hour, Death tips his hat and rings a bell;

the doors open and the twelve apostles parade by; the rooster crows; and the hour is rung.

                     

Over the thousand years of its existence, the Old Town Square has been a silent witness

to important events in Czech history. History left its mark here in the form of

demonstrations, weddings, tournaments and political meetings.

                   

And don't forget to enjoy the great cafes and restaurants of Prague.